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Gaywallet

@Gaywallet@beehaw.org

I’m gay

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Gaywallet,
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Meganucleases can work in quite a few ways. Typically speaking cleaving describes a process in which a section of genome is removed (cutting in two places), but not always. The article doesn’t go into too much detail of the specifics of the meganucleases used in this study, but the literature they cite might.

Gaywallet,
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I wonder if eventually we could sidestep the use of bactiophages and instead manufacture the microscopic structures themselves as sunscreen.

There’s a good number of biological processes that are much simpler, cheaper, and require much less materials when the biological process is preserved. A good example of this is water cleaning/breaking down sewage with bacteria which give off methane which is also collected as fuel. Given that the main outcome here is sunscreen that doesn’t damage biology and it’s generally not that expensive to keep sustain life like this, it might make the most sense to simply leave it at production/farming of bacteriophages.

Gaywallet,
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Of course, the data is not shown.

Link to journal article

Gaywallet,
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

if doctors actually pay attention to what they’re sending out instead of using it as a “make patient go away” button.

Less than 20% of doctors used what the AI generated and instead wrote something themselves. It does not sound like any of these doctors were using it as a “make patient go away” button and they seem to be taking their messaging seriously if they rejected the vast majority of suggestions. However, importantly, their cognitive burden was decreased - indicating that the AI helped jump start their thoughts in the same way that someone handing you a draft novel makes writing a novel easier.

Gaywallet,
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

A potential problem at many places, I’m sure. But of all places, Stanford is one that’s likely to have less of this issue than others. Stanford has plenty of world renown doctors and when you’re world renown you get a lot more pay and a lot more leeway to work how you want to.

Gaywallet, (edited )
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

Less than 20% of doctors using it doesn’t say anything about how those 20% of doctors used it. The fact 80% of doctors didn’t use it says a great deal about what the majority of doctors think about how appropriate it is to use for patient communication.

So to be clear, less than 20% used what the AI generated directly. There’s no stats on whether the clinicians copy/pasted parts of it, rewrote the same info but in different words, or otherwise corrected what was presented. The vast majority of clinicians said it was useful. I’d recommend checking out the open access article, it goes into a lot of this detail. I think they did a great job in terms of making sure it was a useful product before even piloting it. They also go into a lot of detail on the ethical framework they were using to evaluate how useful and ethical it was.

Gaywallet,
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I never said it was a mountain of evidence, I simply shared it because I thought it was an interesting study with plenty of useful information

Gaywallet, (edited )
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

I am in complete agreement. I am a data scientist in health care and over my career I’ve worked on very few ML/AI models, none of which were generative AI or LLM based. I’ve worked on so few because nine times out of ten I am arguing against the inclusion of ML/AI because there are better solutions involving simpler tech. I have serious concerns about ethics when it comes to automating just about anything in patient care, especially when it can effect population health or health equity. However, this was one of the only uses I’ve seen for a generative AI in healthcare where it showed actual promise for being useful, and wanted to share it.

Gaywallet,
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

ah shoot just realized this is a duplicate of another post! Removing

Gaywallet,
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

This is an oversimplification of processes that happen during sleep. This has to do with fat metabolism in brain cells mediated through the effect of specific gene variants.

Gaywallet,
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

If we ignore the costs, wouldn’t it be mostly a game of probabilities? If that’s the case it would be a matter of repeating the treatment often enough to reduce the probability of the virus returning to effectively 0.

Yes, but a game of probabilities can mean that the management of a chronic condition becomes easier. It takes a certain amount of time for HIV to activate into AIDS. Modern management of HIV is a daily medication where dosage has a lot to do with what state you catch HIV in. With something like this, even if we cannot completely remove HIV from the person’s system, we may be able to reverse it to a state where it can be managed by the existing immune system and eliminated/cured, or at the very least can reduce how much of the medication one needs to be taking to keep things in check.

To patients treatments like this might mean that in the future they may simply need to take a single pill or injection or undergo a minor procedure (such as an implant) much less often than once per day. This could greatly reduce the anxiety that one might experience around the question of whether they took their medication that day, or even remove the burden of having to refill/take a medication daily because it is instead an injection or procedure or implant.

We are, of course, a LONG way from this being possible as human application of CRISPR is extremely limited and extremely expensive (we’ve cured sickle cell anemia in several humans now, with costs of the procedure in the millions) at this point in time, but it’s also amazing that we’ve even done that given how new CRISPR is.

Gaywallet,
@Gaywallet@beehaw.org avatar

One of the most promising uses of CRISPR that’s being investigated right now is it’s use to combat climate change by modifying plants to sequester carbon.

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